How to use “If I, would you?” to close more sales

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Many people struggle with making sales. If they do get an appointment they can’t close the deal. This happens because when they are showing a prospect their product or opportunity they are not talking in terms of how it will benefit the prospect. I have found it easier to help someone to get started with your product or service if you are helping them make their life better (which is the real reason you should be in business in the first place).

One of my favorite ways to do that is to ask people questions using “if I, would you? Let’s say you are selling eco-friendly cars. You could say something like, “If I could show you a way to get better gas millage, save a few hundred dollars a year and have less of an impact on the environment, would you be open to checking out this new hybrid model?”

This is an effective opening because you are leading with a benefit the prospect wants. You aren’t telling someone how great your product is and you aren’t telling them how your product is better than what they currently use. You are simply asking them if you do something, will they do something. It’s reciprocal and we are conditioned as humans to respond positively to situations like that.

Another great reason to use this model is you will never waste your time or a potential customer’s time. This is true for a few reasons. One, when you ask them “if I, would you” and they say no, you are not going to go to the next step. If the prospect is not open you are not going to show them how they can do what you asked saving everyone’s time. Also another great thing is that if the prospect is open, they are much more likely to buy because they know exactly what this product or service can do for them and they already agreed if you can show them how to do what you claim they want to hear you out and most likely want to buy.

Nothing is more annoying and turns more people off than a sales person who throws their pitch at you, when you have no interest at all. By simply asking if someone is “open” before you pitch your product or service, you will save a lot of time and won’t annoy or talk to as many unqualified people. By using “if I, would you?” you can be a far more professional sales person and stand out among your peers. And of course bring in a lot more business for yourself and your company.

About Mike MacDonald

Mike Macdonald was born and raised in Minnesota and attended the University of Minnesota for entrepreneurship and economics. Mike is currently a success coach, and consultant with a vacation club. He specializes in helping people with personal development and motivation and leadership training. Mike also has an extensive sales background and has been in the direct marketing industry for 8 years. Follow on Google +.

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